aglac:

postcardsfromspace:

wongtonz:

Aaron Diaz ( creator of Dresden Codak and my favourite LoZ au ) says things. 

WORD.

I will reblog this forever

Wherever perfectionism is driving, shame is riding shotgun. Perfectionism is not about healthy striving, which you see all the time in successful leaders, it’s not about trying to set goals and being the best we can be, perfectionism is basically a cognitive behavioral process that says if I look perfect, work perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid shame, ridicule, and criticism. It’s a defense mechanism.

"Why Doing Awesome Work Means Making Yourself Vulnerable"

So, I’ve been waiting for someone to explain this extremely simple concept to me my entire life.

(via kelsium)

"When I interview leaders, artists, coaches, or athletes who are very successful, they never talk about perfectionism as being a vehicle for success. What they talk about is that perfectionism is a huge trigger, one they have to be aware of all the time, because it gets in the way of getting work done."

Yyyyyyyyep.

(via rumplestiltsqueer)

npr:

Why do we use fruits, vegetables, Twinkies and other food items to describe the idea of someone being [Race A] on the inside, [Race B] on the outside?
Overthinking It: Using Food As A Racial Metaphor
Photo Credit: Christian Cable/Flickr

Because people are delicious. 
In all seriousness, I always wondered this too. I used to get called “Oreo” by a couple family members when I’d visit St. Maarten when I was kid. I assumed it was because I’m mixed, and I didn’t understand the context until I was much older. At the time, I just thought it was cute, because who doesn’t love an Oreo cookie, ya know? 
Shoot, I used to self-describe myself as “Chocolate Milk” when I was in elementary school. “‘Cause my mommie is chocolate and my daddy was milk…”. (I was fucking adorable, you guys.)  
BUT! Obviously descriptions like that are incredibly problematic because it implies that there’s only one way to be [insert minority here] and if you don’t fit whatever stereotype, you’re a “fake”, or trying to be white, or self-hating, etc. And that sucks for everyone. ::sigh:: 

npr:

Why do we use fruits, vegetables, Twinkies and other food items to describe the idea of someone being [Race A] on the inside, [Race B] on the outside?

Overthinking It: Using Food As A Racial Metaphor

Photo Credit: Christian Cable/Flickr

Because people are delicious. 

In all seriousness, I always wondered this too. I used to get called “Oreo” by a couple family members when I’d visit St. Maarten when I was kid. I assumed it was because I’m mixed, and I didn’t understand the context until I was much older. At the time, I just thought it was cute, because who doesn’t love an Oreo cookie, ya know? 

Shoot, I used to self-describe myself as “Chocolate Milk” when I was in elementary school. “‘Cause my mommie is chocolate and my daddy was milk…”. (I was fucking adorable, you guys.)  

BUT! Obviously descriptions like that are incredibly problematic because it implies that there’s only one way to be [insert minority here] and if you don’t fit whatever stereotype, you’re a “fake”, or trying to be white, or self-hating, etc. And that sucks for everyone. ::sigh:: 

I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.
Jonathan Carroll  (via psych-facts)

choochoobear reblogged your post o/~ I woke up like dis… o/~  (hah… and added:

Just another day of being a webcartoonist.

You look amazing but I cannot stop laughing at the two dudes. Especially the one where the guy is like "Ooo~" and you're all like "Nope"

The gifs are funnier on their own. Trust. :D 

o/~ I woke up like dis… o/~ 

(hahahahaha… oh geez)

Going with the general conscientious and not sharing the videos…

But I’m going to gif the shit out of sections I’m in and share it because it makes me feel like Beyonce, and goddamnit I want to pretend I’m Beyonce.  

Dilemma: Vanity vs Quality

Hrm….

So a few months ago I helped a director friend out with a gig by being a last-minute model for a project. He was directing and editing it as a favor for his actor buddy who wanted to do these series of 1min comedy shorts. I was promised to get deferred pay, but that never happened. I asked director friend what happened… and he told me actor buddy turned into a massive dick and pushed him (and everyone else involved) out of the project. Actor buddy decided he wanted to rewrite and edit the thing himself because he could make it “funnier”. He didn’t pay anyone who was promised to be paid later, and kinda just avoided answering people’s emails. 

Cut to today and actor buddy has released all of the videos he made on his own… and well… they’re pretty horrible. Just very not funny at all. The videos are definitely NOT what I was told the project was going to be (a parody perfume commercial) and now its a series of just shitty… I don’t know what they are really. It’s just weird. And bad… so bad….

I don’t care that I didn’t get paid for the project because the end result of it was so so bad, and I feel like that’s a karmic thing on its own. It was only supposed to be $75 anyway, so no major loss there. (Pay people to do the job you hired them to do and you usually get better results, duh.)

However… because the footage was shot and lit by competent people, I look pretty damn good. I’m a bit vain (haha).

So here’s my dilemma… Do I share these videos with you all, or do I let them properly faded away into the internet ethos like they should?

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

Dang, I love those movies, but yeah that’s a problematic thing. Yup. Yup. 

gyop

gyop

1. If he doesn’t answer, don’t keep sending texts. If he wanted to talk to you, he would’ve responded.

2. People will make time for you when they care about you. If he says he’s too busy or constantly cancels his plans, he doesn’t care. People fight for you when they care.

3. Don’t let him touch you on the first date. If he tries, he’s not there for the same reasons you are.

4. You can tell a lot about a person by their favorite book.

5. If he can stomach more than ten straight shots without feeling a thing, he drinks too much.

6. Ask the uncomfortable things. When was the last time he was so high he couldn’t speak? What does he regret the most? Does he drink to remember or to forget?

7. Don’t send pictures unless you want to. If he has to talk you into it, don’t do it. If you hesitate, don’t do it. If you do take a picture, don’t include your face. Keep yourself safe.

8. If you can’t laugh when you’re having sex with him, maybe you aren’t sleeping with the right person. Sex isn’t about tricks and tips and routines.

9. If he hurts you, cut him out. He’s gone, he isn’t coming back, and you don’t need to prolong the pain.

10. Don’t be afraid to open up again. I promise not everyone will love you with a knife behind their back.

Boy advice from someone who made the same mistakes too often (via guiseofgentlewords)